It's still snowing, but that's to be expected. It's April and that happens pretty regularly. The nice, warm weather can be such a tease though...

It's truly a delight to see my work on the wall in someone's home. That's where I think the art shows the best, in situ, in a home surrounded by furniture, windows and people. Huge thanks then to local Park City interior design firm, Alder & Tweed, for this amazing video that includes one of my largest paintings - a diptych called Fate & Luck. Hats of to Alder & Tweed for their amazing skills and this fabulous video, which also includes the works of fellow Gallery MAR artists Matt Flint and Nina Tichava.


Montage from Alder and Tweed on Vimeo.


In preparation of our upcoming trip to Spain to walk the Camino de Santiago, I am trying to get in some mileage. We've been walking on the rail trail a lot lately because there's a lot of miles there and I feel like the wide, gravel trail could be similar to what we'll be walking in Spain. There are some lovely views from the rail trail. I tried to capture one here.

For a while now I have been infatuated with indigo and shibori dyed textiles - I've even had dreams about them. Then after happening upon a well written DIY post, I realized that I too could dye my own shibori. I bought a Jacquard Indigo Tie Dye Kit, a stack of tea towels, cloth napkins, and even some extra cotton fabric and got after it. Now, after two shibori days, I can say I am in love. Don't expect a textile business any time soon, but there might be some shibori present gifted away, because I really enjoy the process and love undoing the binding to see the final result.

The results of my second Shibori Day. The second time around, I let the fabric soak longer and for multiple times to get darker, richer blues.



First thing you have to do is bind your cloth. Shibori is basically really, really advanced tie-dying. There are many, many ways to bind your cloth and all have special names and interesting techniques. You can wrap beans in the fabric, use thread to make cones, rubber bands, pieces of wood to sandwich the fabric and much more. In case you're curious, I bought these two books - Shibori Designs & Techniques and A Handbook of Indigo Dyeing to understand the main binding techniques.



Following the directions of the indigo kit, I mixed the dye and the other chemicals in a big tupperware container. You can do it in a regular bucket, but they recommend that you have a tight-fitting lid to minimize its contact with oxygen so the dye will last longer. When you first mix it all together, it kind of fizzes and then forms this crazy metallic film on the top. Apparently, this is a good thing.



Then I took all my prepared fabrics and put them in a bucket of water to soak. When you are ready to dye, take one out, wring out the water and prepare to dye.



I definitely recommend wearing the big, long gloves. Here I am dying my first piece.



The dye comes out bright green at first and then as the dye oxidizes it will turn indigo. You can see here that the insides of the fabric have not been dyed, because they are still white.



A range of colors - the green just came out of the vat, then turquoise has oxidized a bit, then the darker blues are fully oxidized. Science!



Here is a beautiful piece that was accordion folded, then sandwhiched between two square pieces of wood and held together with rubber bands. When I unfold this, it will have a square pattern.



I unfolded this one first - it was folded into triangles and then sandwiched between wood pieces. As it comes out, some of the interior folds haven't seen oxygen yet and are still green. It is so much fun to unfold or unbind the fabric. Definitely the best part of the process.



Here, I've taken my trusty seem ripper to undo the cone-shaped wrapped sections. It has a very tie-dye feel, but far more sophisticated.

The results of the first Shibori Day! After unbinding the fabric, ensure that everything has oxidized, then you can rinse in fresh water to get rid of excess dye. Afterwards, I threw all the towels in the washing machine and rinsed a number of times to get rid of the dye. I am hoping they no longer bleed, but to be safe, I'll wash them with darks this next time.



Seriously, it was SO MUCH FUN. Looking forward to getting another set of napkins and towels and maybe even a table cloth and some white shirts.

During a much needed desert weekend, we ended up in Ivins where I had some time to do a little watercolor. I did a basic sketch, then laid down the watercolor. I was unimpressed by just the watercolor so I decided to add some ink. And then I added some more ink and I kept going until it looked respectable.
"Interval"
47 x 20 in; March 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
AVAILABLE at Gallery MAR


Went on Ski Utah's Interconnect Tour, which allows you to ski 6 resorts without any driving. You literally ski from resort to resort to resort using backcountry routes as well as shared ridge lines. It was an incredible day - great skiing, lovely company, and stellar views. The amazing part is that all of these resorts are just a couple miles from my house as the crow flies, but driving takes over an hour to get home. I took like a zillion photos today - does it count as a write-off since it was work related? The top picture is on top of Scott's Peak looking south towards 10420 peak with Brighton Resort on the right. Below was taken on our last run in Snowbird before we skied to the Tram deck.


"Prime Time"
34 x 56 in; March 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
AVAILABLE at Gallery MAR


One of my latest paintings, "Meanwhile," just found its home with a great family in Park City. Thanks to Gallery MAR for this great placement!
And I went skiing with my sweetie! Thanks for a great weekend.
"Elapsing"
23 x 23 in; February 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
AVAILABLE at Gallery MAR

"Meanwhile"
47 x 19 in; February 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
SOLD

"Olympic Club Study"
26 x 17 in; February 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
AVAILABLE at Gallery MAR

"Standing Still"
26 x 17 in; February 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
SOLD

Gallery MAR posted a great picture of my latest diptych, "Swift & Sure," hanging in the gallery on their Instagram feed. I don't have a place big enough to hang the multi-paneled paintings to see them all together, so it's awful nice when they finally do get to hang next to each other.

I am proud to announce my inclusion in the book Encaustic Art in the Twenty-First Century. This seems to me a pretty big deal to be included in the book alongside some amazing artists and especially the pioneers of the new encaustic movement in the last two decades. I am honored. Thank you to Anne Lee and E. Ashley Rooney for making this book and putting me in it! And its also pretty cool to have my profile shown as part of the look inside pages available online. Pick up your copy at your favorite book seller or Amazon.

Encaustic Art in the Twenty-First Century by Anne Lee & E. Ashley Rooney. 
Foreword by Kim Bernard, Afterword by Ellen Koment 

From beehive to hotplate to the artist’s hand, encaustic has evolved as a versatile medium applied to almost every artistic style. A long-overdue look at a newly popular art form, this book explores 79 North American artists’ feelings about their work in encaustic and how they use it to express their inner worlds and the world around them. Eight chapters organize the artists by geographical region and focus on how the heated beeswax and resin material is used to create seductive, skin-like surfaces and rich, layered membranes. More than 2,000 years old, this cross-disciplinary medium ranges from painting to sculpture, assemblage, collage, and printmaking and encourages risk-taking in a way that other materials do not. Its inherent contradictions–it can be hot or cold, malleable or solid, opaque or translucent, layered or thin, permanent or fragile–make it all the more fascinating.
"Swift & Sure"
26 x 60 in Diptych; February 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
AVAILABLE at Gallery MAR

"In Passing"
20 x 20 in; January 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
AVAILABLE at Gallery MAR

"Temporal State"
25 x 40 in; January 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
SOLD

In the winter, we snowmobile in and out of our house because it is too costly and time consuming to plow home. Also we love that it becomes a winter wonderland that allows us to ski right from our deck and play in the snow all day. However, it does make painting delivery to the gallery a bit more complicated. To get my latest painting, Prelude (54x36 in), into the gallery, it takes teamwork from me and my husband. He drives the snowmobile, while I lay in the toboggan and hold onto the painting. It looks like I'm just hanging out, but it's actually quite the ab workout holding on while Matt navigates the bumps and turns as we slowly drive to the car. We think it makes for an interesting story of how paintings make it into town though.
"Prelude"
54 x 36 in; January 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
SOLD

According to Chase Bank, you too can get the Sundance Style by following these simple tips and hits about decor, clothes and throwing parties. And my art is included in their recommendations! A short interview with Gallery MAR owner, Maren Mullin explains how my art can give you a taste of the Park City Mountains even back at home. Thanks for the love Chase!
"Timely Gift"
40 x 30 in; January 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
SOLD
 "Time With Friends"
10 x 10 in; January 2016
Encaustic + Milk Paint
SOLD